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  • The inaugural US E-Cigarette Summit was held in Washington DC, on Monday May 8, 2017 and welcomed over 250 people
  • The 2nd Annual US E-Cigarette Summit will take place April 30, 2018......Registration is now open

 

2018 Speakers

Mitch Zeller
Mitch Zeller

Director, Center for Tobacco Products

Mitch Zeller, J.D., became director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products in March 2013. The mission of CTP—established by enactment of the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act—is “to make tobacco-related death and disease part of America’s past, not America’s future, and, by doing so, ensure a healthier life for every American family.”

“Today, FDA has an unprecedented opportunity to use the new tools in the Tobacco Control Act,” Zeller said. “Product regulation is a powerful component of a comprehensive strategy to reduce the death and disease from tobacco use. We will marshal the science to support new policies to help combat the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States,” he added.

Zeller, a graduate of Dartmouth College and the American University Washington College of Law, has been working on FDA issues for more than 30 years. He began his career as a public interest attorney in 1982 at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). In 1988, Zeller left CSPI to become counsel to the Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations Subcommittee of the House of Representatives Government Operations Committee where he conducted oversight of enforcement of federal health and safety laws.

In 1993, Zeller joined the staff of then-FDA Commissioner Dr. David Kessler, M.D. What began as a two-week assignment by Kessler to examine the practices of the tobacco industry led to his serving as associate commissioner and director of FDA’s first Office of Tobacco Programs. Instrumental in crafting the agency’s 1996 tobacco regulations, Zeller also represented FDA before Congress, federal and state agencies. Zeller also served as an official U.S. delegate to the World Health Organization (WHO) Working Group for the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

In 2000, Zeller left FDA to continue his work for tobacco control as executive vice president of the American Legacy Foundation. His responsibilities there included marketing, communications, strategic partnerships, and, in 2002, creating the foundation’s first Office of Policy and Government Relations. That year, Zeller joined Pinney Associates where, as senior vice president, he provided strategic planning and communications advice on domestic and global public health policy issues involving the treatment of tobacco dependence and the regulation of tobacco products and pharmaceuticals.

Zeller, who is also a professorial lecturer at American University School of Law, lives with his family in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Attorney General Tom Miller
Attorney General Tom Miller

Attorney General of Iowa

Attorney General Tom Miller is serving in his ninth four-year term as Attorney General of Iowa. Tom Miller grew up in Dubuque, where his father was the long-time county assessor and an inspiration for Tom’s early interest in public service.  He graduated from Wahlert High School in 1962 and Loras College in 1966, and received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1969. Mr. Miller has earned a reputation for integrity, high quality legal work, and strong work on behalf of ordinary Iowans.

Attorney General Miller is known for his long-time fight on behalf of kids and taxpayers with his campaign to reduce the enormous death toll and financial costs of tobacco addiction and disease.  He was a leader in the multistate settlement agreement that resulted in the tobacco industry paying billions of dollars to the states and changing the way it conducts business. Now Attorney General Miller is working to reduce youth addiction and the thousands of Iowans who die every year from tobacco-related disease.

Mr. Miller has a long record of achieving results through cooperation with other state attorneys general and with local, state and federal officials, regardless of their political affiliation.  He has served as President of the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) and received NAAG’s Wyman Award as the attorney general who contributed most to NAAG and its members.  He has chaired several NAAG committees and led major multistate working groups working on tobacco issues, antitrust enforcement, agriculture, and consumer protection.

“I consider it my duty and my privilege to be the people’s lawyer,” Attorney General Miller says. “I am deeply grateful for being able to serve as Attorney General of Iowa.”

Prof Thomas J. Glynn, PhD
Prof Thomas J. Glynn, PhD

Adjunct Lecturer, Stanford Prevention Research Centre, Stanford University School of Medicine

Thomas J. Glynn, PhD is currently Adjunct Lecturer, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, California. From 1998 to 2014, he was Director, Cancer Science and Trends and Director, International Cancer Control at the American Cancer Society (ACS), in Washington, DC. In these positions, he advised the ACS about emerging research and policy issues in tobacco/cancer prevention and control, recommended tobacco/cancer prevention and control research and policy which is ready for national/global application, and participated in the development of an international cancer control program aimed at promoting tobacco and cancer prevention-related research, advocacy, treatment, and policy change, particularly in middle- and low-income nations.

Prior to coming to the ACS, Dr. Glynn was, from 1991 to 1994, Associate Director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Cancer Control Science Program and, from 1991 to 1998, Chief of the NCI’s Cancer Control Extramural Research Branch. There, he directed the development of a national program of research aimed at reducing the incidence and prevalence of cancer, primarily through dietary change, tobacco use reduction, and adherence to cancer screening guidelines. From 1983 to 1991, he was Research Director for the NCI’s Smoking, Tobacco, and Cancer Program.

Dr. Glynn is widely published on cancer and tobacco use prevention and control, both in the scientific literature and for consumer, professional, and patient education audiences. He has served as a consultant on cancer control and tobacco issues to such groups as the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Mayo Clinic, and state and local governments, as well as a wide range of international organizations. He has also served as a Senior Scientific Reviewer for many U.S. Surgeon General’s Reports on Tobacco and Health, as Director of the World Health Organization Study of Health, Economic, and Policy Implications of Tobacco Growth and Consumption in Developing Countries, and has been active in tobacco control programs in Eastern Europe, Central America, and India. His awards include the U.S. National Institutes of Health Merit Award, the Polish Ministry of Health Service Award, the Guatemala National Council for Tobacco Prevention and Control Meritorious Service Award, the American Society of Preventive Oncology Joseph W. Cullen Memorial Award, and the SRNT’s John Slade Award.

 

Prof Hayden McRobbie
Prof Hayden McRobbie

Clinical Director, Dragon Institute for Innovation (NZ), Professor in Public Health Interventions, Queen Mary University, University of London

Hayden McRobbie is Professor in Public Health Interventions at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London (UK), Clinical Director of the Dragon Institute for Innovation (NZ) and a Senior Medical Officer at Counties Manukau District Health Board.

After completing his medical degree, he went on to study in London and gained a PhD in medical psychology. He now has over 18 years experience in the provision of behaviour change interventions in the fields of smoking cessation and weight management.  Hayden has played a key role in Tobacco Control in New Zealand and has provided clinical advice to the Ministry of Health since 2008. He is also the Minsitry’s Childhood Obesity Clinical Practice Champion.

Dr Robin Mermelstein
Dr Robin Mermelstein

Professor of Psychology and IHRP Director, University of Illinois, Chicago

Robin Mermelstein, PhD. is Distinguished Professor, Psychology Department; Director of the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), and Co-Director of UIC’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science.  Dr. Mermelstein has been active in health-behavior research for 30 years, with continuous NIH funding as a Principal Investigator on grants since 1986. Dr. Mermelstein was acknowledged by the NCI as a Research Pioneer in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences. She is nationally recognized for her expertise in understanding trajectories and developmental patterns of youth tobacco use, for employing novel approaches to studying contextual factors in the development of nicotine dependence and health risk behaviors, for developing innovative health behavior clinical interventions for adolescents and adults, and for methodological issues in conducting tobacco-related research. She has been the PI of several large-scale, multidisciplinary program project and center grants, as well as the Director of a national program or the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Mermelstein has served on many NIH advisory and review committees, including being a former standing member of the NCI-A Cancer Centers review committee; a former member of the External Scientific Advisory Panel for the NCI’s Science of Research and Technology Branch; co-Chair of the NCI’s Tobacco Control Priorities Consultant Group; a former standing member of the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s K-award study section; and a current member of the External Scientific Advisory Board for the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study (ABCD Study) of NIH. She has been acknowledged for her scientific accomplishments by several national and international research societies, including being named a Fellow of the Association of Psychological Science, a Fellow of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, and a Fellow of the Society for Research in Nicotine and Tobacco. She is a past President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (2015-2016).

 

Prof K. Michael Cummings
Prof K. Michael Cummings

Co-Leader Tobacco Research Program, Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Cummings is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina where he co-leads the tobacco control research program. Over his nearly 40 year public health career he has published over 430 scientific papers on a wide range of topics including studies evaluating methods for smoking cessation, consumer risk perceptions, evaluations of mass media campaigns, tobacco product marketing, the impact of cigarette design on smoking behaviors,  tobacco industry documents, and the impact of public policies on tobacco use behaviors.

Prof Eric A. Feldman
Prof Eric A. Feldman

Professor of Law, Professor of Medical Ethics & Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Law School

Eric Feldman’s expertise is in Japanese law, comparative public health law, torts, and law and society. His books and articles explore the comparative dimensions of rights, dispute resolution, and legal culture, often in the context of urgent policy issues including the regulation of smoking, HIV/AIDS, and natural and nuclear disasters. Feldman has twice been a Fulbright Scholar in Japan and has received grants and fellowships from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the American Bar Association, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council, among others. He is the author or editor of books published by Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Harvard University Press, and his articles have appeared in journals including the California Law Review, Law in Japan, American Journal of Comparative Law, Los Angeles Times, Social and Legal Studies, Hastings Center Report, Lancet, Law and Society Review, and the Journal of General Internal Medicine

Dr. Lion Shahab
Dr. Lion Shahab

Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor in Health Psychology, University College London

Dr Shahab is a Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor in Health Psychology at University College London and trained in psychology, epidemiology and neuroscience. He has more than 12 years’ experience in addiction research, tobacco control and health psychology with a particular interest in novel behavioural and pharmacological smoking cessation interventions, biomarkers, tobacco product regulation and policy, digital health and tobacco and alcohol use epidemiology. Dr Shahab has collaborated with academic as well as non-academic (e.g. governmental and non-governmental) partners and to date has authored over 75 scientific papers, reports and reviews in this area.

Professor Neal L. Benowitz MD
Professor Neal L. Benowitz MD

Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco

Neal L. Benowitz, MD, is Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, and Chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He received his medical degree from the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1969, following which he served as a resident in internal medicine at the Bronx Municipal Hospital Center from 1969 to 1971. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical pharmacology at UCSF and joined the faculty in 1974. His research interests have focused primarily on the human pharmacology and toxicology of nicotine. He has published more than 500 research papers. Dr Benowitz also maintains an active clinical practice in cardiovascular medicine and medical toxicology.

Dr Benowitz was a scientific editor of the 1988 United States Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health: Nicotine Addiction; a scientific editor of the 2001 NCI Monograph 13 Report on Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine; and served as section editor for the 2010 Surgeon General’s Report on How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. He,has served as a member of the National Institutes of Health Pharmacology Study Section, the FDA Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee and the FDA Tobacco Products Science Advisory Committee. He is a member of a number of medical societies, including the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. He has served as President of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and as President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Dr Benowitz has received the Ove Ferno, Alton Ochsner, and Rawls-Palmer Progress in Medicine awards, and the Oscar B. Hunter Memorial Award in Therapeutics for his research on nicotine, tobacco, and health, and was the 2002 UCSF Annual Distinguished Clinical Research Lecturer.

 

Deborah Arnott
Deborah Arnott

Chief Executive, Action on Smoking and Health (UK)

Deborah Arnott is a recognised international expert on tobacco control and the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, with a particular interest in nicotine regulation and harm reduction. She was a member of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence committee which developed guidance for England on tobacco harm reduction and of an expert advisory group to the UK’s medicines regulator the MHRA on e-cigarettes.  She also has experience of product regulation under the EU General Product Safety Directive having participated in the development of fire safety requirements for cigarettes.

Deborah has an MBA from Cranfield, is an honorary Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham, and a member of the Royal College of Physicians Tobacco Advisory Group.  She was awarded the Alwyn Smith prize in 2007 by the Faculty of Public Health for her outstanding contribution to public health.

Competing Interest: None Stated

Professor Ann McNeill
Professor Ann McNeill

Professor of Tobacco Addiction, UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), Kings College London

Ann McNeill is a Professor of Addictions in the National Addiction Centre with a focus on tobacco. She graduated from the University of Nottingham with a first class joint honours degree in zoology and psychology and then carried out her PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry focusing on the development of dependence on smoking. Since that time she has held a variety of academic and public sector posts focusing largely on tobacco control research. Ann has an established international reputation, receiving a World Health Organisation award for contributions to tobacco control in 1998.

She has published more than 250 academic papers book chapters, reports and opinion pieces on the subject and her research ranges across prevention, cessation, harm reduction and local, national and international policy. Ann was a co-author of the recent systematic review of tobacco product packaging which underpinned the recent government consultation on plain packaging and has a particular interest in the relationship between smoking, mental health and inequalities. She is Deputy Director of the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies.

Competing Interest: None Stated

David Abrams PhD
David Abrams PhD

Professor, College of Global Public Health, New York University

David B. Abrams holds a B.Sc. (Hons.) in Psychology and Computer Science from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa and a Ph.D. in Clinical Health Psychology from Rutgers University.. Prior to joining NYU, Abrams was professor and founding director of the Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine at Brown University Medical School. He then directed the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health (NIH). He was founding Director of The Schroeder National Institute of Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at Truth Initiative/American Legacy Foundation and Professor of Health Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has published over 270 scholarly articles and been a Principal Investigator on numerous grants. He is lead author of The Tobacco Dependence Treatment Handbook: A Guide to Best Practices. He received The Joseph Cullen Memorial Award from the American Society for Preventive Oncology for lifetime contributions to tobacco control; Research Laureate Award, American Academy of Health Behavior; and the distinguished Alumni Award, Rutgers University. Abrams served on the Board of Scientific Advisors of the NIH National Cancer Institute; was President of the Society for Behavioral Medicine and is a recipient of their Distinguished Scientist and Research Mentor Awards. Dr. Abram’s focus is on the science of nicotine use to inform practice, policy and regulation to minimize the harms that are overwhelmingly caused by the deadly smoke from combusting tobacco products.

 

Clive Bates
Clive Bates

Director, Counterfactual Consulting Ltd

Clive Bates has had a diverse career in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors.  He started out with the IT company, IBM, then switched career to work in the environment movement. From 1997-2003 he was Director of Action on Smoking and Health (UK), campaigning to reduce the harms caused by tobacco. In 2003 he joined Prime Minister Blair’s Strategy Unit as a civil servant and worked in senior roles in the public sector and for the United Nations in Sudan. He is now Director of Counterfactual, a consulting and advocacy practice focussed on a pragmatic approach to sustainability and public health.

Prof Eric C. Donny
Prof Eric C. Donny

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest School of Medicine

Dr. Donny is a Professor of Physiology & Pharmacology and Social Sciences and Health Policy and Director of the Tobacco Control Center of Excellence at Wake Forest School of Medicine. His expertise includes behavioral pharmacology, biological and health psychology, addiction, and regulatory science. His current interests focus on regulatory approaches to reducing the health burden of tobacco. He co-directs the Center for the Evaluation of Nicotine in Cigarettes (CENIC), an NIDA/FDA-funded cooperative agreement that aims to increase understanding of how behavior and health might be affected if the nicotine content of combustible tobacco products is reduced.

Matthew L. Myers
Matthew L. Myers

President, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Matthew L. Myers is President of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, a leader in the fight to reduce tobacco use and its devastating consequences in the United States and around the world.

In 1996, Mr. Myers helped to found the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and has been with the Campaign since its inception. Initially, he served as its Executive Vice President and Legal Counsel and oversaw the Campaign’s legal and advocacy efforts. On January 1, 2000, Mr. Myers became the Campaign’s President.

In his position at the Campaign Mr. Myers helped to lead the Campaign’s effort to defend FDA’s assertion of jurisdiction over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products in 1996.  Mr Myers then served as a close advisor to the State Attorneys General in the 1990s when they sued the tobacco industry.

He participated in the 1996 negotiations that led to the first ever settlement with a tobacco company, Liggett and Myers, an agreement that broke the tobacco industry’s unity and resulted in the release of a massive amount of previously secret tobacco industry documents.

In 1997, at the request of the State Attorneys General and the White House, Mr. Myers participated in the negotiations that led to the unprecedented agreement between the tobacco industry and the states in June 1997. He then served as one of the leading spokespersons for the legislative debate related to that settlement that followed in Congress.

Mr. Myers subsequently advised a number of State Attorneys General during the negotiations that led to the Master Settlement Agreement in 1998 and oversaw the Campaign’s effort to get the states to use Master Settlement Agreement funds for comprehensive tobacco control.

Since that time under Mr. Myers’ leadership the Campaign has been a leader in the effort to raise tobacco taxes, expand protection against secondhand smoke and fund effective comprehensive tobacco control programs at the state level

Prof Amy Fairchild
Prof Amy Fairchild

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Texas A&M School of Public Health

David Graham
David Graham

Chief Impact Officer, NJOY

David Graham is Chief Impact Officer at NJOY, a role which leads efforts across the company to maximize the positive impact on public health of the company’s products and services through increasing their reach and effectiveness while including oversight of regulatory affairs for the company. He has extensive experience in nicotine and non-nicotine new product development, tobacco control policy, and related regulation in the international healthcare and e-vapor industries spanning ~ 25 years. Beginning with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)/smoking cessation products in the UK in 1992, followed by International product and category development roles in Sweden, he moved to the USA in 2000 with Pharmacia, subsequently becoming part of Pfizer and then moving to Johnson & Johnson.

In 2013, he joined NJOY to lead the regulatory affairs, quality & compliance function for the company and prepare for regulation by FDA and other regulatory agencies in the US and abroad. In addition to multiple interactions with FDA, and other regulatory agencies internationally, David co-led NJOY’s engagement with the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) on its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award for NJOY to develop an Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS) for use for clinical research in smoking cessation, leading to the establishment of the first FDA Drug Master File (DMF) for ENDS products. In late 2016, David co-founded and was President of Reveritas Group, a multi-partner consultancy firm of specialists and preferred providers formed to aid ENDS companies navigate all aspects of FDA’s Premarket Tobacco Application (PMTA) process via a total programming approach, and/or provide select outsourced resources as required. Following FDA’s extension of the PMTA compliance deadline, David returned to NJOY in August 2017 in his current role.

David is a graduate of Columbia University with a Master’s in Public Policy & Administration.

Prof Lynn T. Kozlowski
Prof Lynn T. Kozlowski

Professor of Community Health and Health Behavior, School of Public Health & Health Professions, University at Buffalo, SUNY

Lynn T. Kozlowski, PhD, professor of Community Health and Health Behavior and former dean of the School of Public Health and Health Professions at the University at Buffalo, holds a bachelor’s degree from Wesleyan University and a doctorate in psychology from Columbia University. His research focuses on addictions, tobacco use, tobacco epidemiology, ethics and tobacco policy. He has held faculty positions at the Wesleyan University, the University of Toronto, and Penn State. Kozlowski is a senior editor of the journal Addiction and associate editor of Tobacco Control. He is a Fellow of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

Prof David Levy
Prof David Levy

Professor, Lombardl Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University

David Levy has a PhD in Economics from UCLA and is currently a Professor of Oncology at Georgetown. He has published over 200 papers, including articles in the American Economic Review, American Journal of Public Health, JAMA, Lancet, Medical Care, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Obesity Review, Tobacco Control, and the Review of Economics and Statistics. His work spans topics in public health and industry behavior.

Dr. Levy has been principal investigator of grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bloomberg/Gates Foundation, European Union, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  He is currently principal investigator of grants from NCI’s Tobacco Control Research Branch (part oft he ITC project) NCI’s CISNET program and NIDA. Dr. Levy oversees the design and development of the SimSmoke tobacco policy simulation model, which predicts the effect of tobacco policies, such as tax increases, smoke-free air laws, media campaigns, youth access policies, and cessation treatment policies, on smoking rates and tobacco-related deaths. He has developed models for 10 states and for over 60 countries. He is currently developing simulation models that incorporate the use of smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes.